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Archive for March 15, 2011

Human trafficking and modern day slavery

Trafficking has become a lucrative industry and is the fastest growing criminal industry in the world. Globally, it is tied with the illegal trade, as the second largest criminal activity, followed by the drug trade. Human trafficking usually affects women and children more than it affects men. Sex trafficking is nothing less than slavery because when an offender takes a woman or girl against her will and forces her to engage in prostitution, he not only sells her body but also her freedom and dignity. Much sex trafficking is international, with victims being taken from places such as South and Southeast Asia, the former Soviet Union, Central and South America, and other less-developed areas to more developed places including Asia, the Middle East, Western Europe, and North America. Those who profit from victimizing children and adults in the sex trade are only one half of the problem. The other half is those who patronize this industry.

The total annual revenue for trafficking in persons is estimated to be between USD$5 billion and $9 billion. The Council of Europe states, “People trafficking have reached epidemic proportions over the past decade, with a global annual market of about $42.5 billion,” and The United Nations estimates nearly 2.5 million people from 127 different countries are being trafficked around the world.

Human trafficking differs from people smuggling. As for smuggling, people voluntarily request or hire an individual, known as a smuggler, to transport them from one country to another, where legal entry would be denied upon arrival at the international border. After entry into the country and arrival at their destination, the smuggled person is free to find their own way, while smuggling requires travel, trafficking does not. Victims of human trafficking are not permitted to leave upon arrival at their destination, they are held against their will through acts of coercion and forced to work or provide services to the trafficker or others. The work includes anything from bonded or forced labor to commercialized sexual exploitation.

1. How Does Human Trafficking Take Place?

Traffickers find their victims from developing countries where poverty is widespread, commonly through force or deception. The victims are typically very young, from 8 to 18 years old and some as young as 4 or 5 years old. A common scenario involves a poor Asian or Eastern European girl who is offered a “better life” as a housemaid, restaurant server or dancer in a wealthy country such as the United States, Great Britain, or Italy. As she arrives, her passport is taken away, she is physically and sexually abused and forced into prostitution in a country where she neither speaks the language nor have any friends nor relatives. She is forced to service 8-15 clients a day and does not receive any pay as she is told that the money is used to pay off her “debt” to the trafficker and brothel owners for transportation, food, lodging and so on. After some period of time, she will be resold to another brothel owner, often in another country, and the cycle will continue all over again. She is likely to acquire HIV/AIDS, and to pass it on to her clients and their wives, all around the world. She has a greater chance than most of dying early, and is certain to live a horrible existence in whatever short years she has. Even if she is eventually rescued and repatriated to her country and community, she is likely to be ostracized as a result of her involvement in prostitution.

Government and police corruption, primarily in under-developed countries, play a large role in the perpetuation of the sex slave industry, with blind-eyes being turned toward openly active brothels and payoffs being accepted by those officials charged with the enforcement of national and international laws prohibiting trafficking, prostitution and child sexual exploitation.

Click at the pictures for a larger image.

2. Types of labor work

Bonded labor, or debt bondage, is probably the least known form of labor trafficking today, and yet it is the most widely used method of enslaving people. Victims become bonded laborers when their labor is demanded as a means of repayment for a loan or service in which its terms and conditions have not been defined or in which the value of the victims’ services as reasonably assessed is not applied toward the liquidation of the debt. The value of their work is greater than the original sum of money “borrowed.”

Forced labor is when victims are forced to work against their own will, under the threat of violence or some other form of punishment, their freedom is restricted and a degree of ownership is exerted. Men are at risk of being trafficked for unskilled work, which globally generates $31bn according to the International Labor Organization. Forms of forced labor can include domestic servitude; agricultural labor; sweatshop factory labor; janitorial, food service and other service industry labor; and begging.

Sex trafficking victims are generally found in poor circumstances and easily targeted by traffickers. These circumstances include homeless individuals, runaway teens, displaced homemakers, refugees, and drug addicts. While it may seem like trafficked people are the most vulnerable and powerless minorities in a region, victims are consistently exploited from any ethnic and social background. Traffickers are known as pimps or madams, offers promises of marriage, employment, education, and/or an overall better life. However, in the end, traffickers force the victims to become prostitutes or work in the sex industry. Various works in the sex industry includes prostitution, dancing in strip clubs, performing in pornographic films and pornography, and other forms of involuntary servitude. Women are lured to accompany traffickers based on promises of lucrative opportunities unachievable in their native country. Most have been told lies regarding the financial arrangements and conditions of their employment and find themselves in coercive or abusive situations from which escape is both difficult and dangerous. According to the U.S. Department of Justice, there were 1,229 human trafficking incidents in the United States from January 2007- September 2008. Of these, 83 % were sex trafficking cases.

Child labor is a form of work that is likely to be hazardous to the physical, mental, spiritual, moral, or social development of children and can interfere with their education. The International Labor Organization estimates worldwide that there are 246 million exploited children aged between 5 and 17 involved in debt bondage, forced recruitment for armed conflict, prostitution, pornography, the illegal drug trade, the illegal arms trade, and other illicit activities around the world.

3. Trafficking in children

Trafficking of children is the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harboring, or receipt of children for the purpose of exploitation. Trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation of children can take many forms and include forcing a child into prostitution or other forms of sexual activity or child pornography. Child exploitation can also include forced labor or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude, the removal of organs, illicit international adoption, trafficking for early marriage, recruitment as child soldiers, for use in begging or as athletes (such as child camel jockeys or football players), or for recruitment for cults.

Thailand and Brazil are considered to have the worst child sex trafficking records. One of the major reasons is the parent’s extreme poverty where they sell their children in order to pay debts or gain income. Some is deceived that the traffickers will give a better life and education for their children. The adoption process, legal or illegal, can sometimes result in cases of trafficking of babies and pregnant women between the West and the developing world. Thousands of children from Asia, Africa, and South America are sold into the global sex trade every year. Often they are kidnapped or orphaned, and sometimes they are actually sold by their own families.

Trafficking victims are also exposed to different psychological problems. They suffer social alienation in the host and home countries. Stigmatization, social exclusion and intolerance make reintegration into local communities difficult. The governments offer little assistance and social services to trafficked victims upon their return.

4. Global nature of the problem

Sex trafficking is global in nature and the victims come from all developing countries and are trafficked into or through virtually all developing and developed countries. It is estimated, for example, that 50,000 people are trafficked into the United States every year, most of who are sold into prostitution. This is not dependent on nationality, race or religion and not on economic or social standing. The one substantial difference is that it is the wealthy countries – through their military, businessmen, tourists, and Internet pornography subscribers, all of whom pay significantly more for the use of a sex slave that keeps this criminal industry extremely profitable for traffickers.

Trafficking does not only occur in poor countries, but in fact in every country. A source country is a country where people are trafficked and these countries are often weakened by poverty, war, corruption, natural disasters or climate. Some examples of source countries are Nepal, Guatemala, and the former Soviet Union, Nigeria, Thailand, China, Albania, Bulgaria, Belarus, Moldova, Ukraine and many more. Then there is transit country where the victims are enslaved and the destination country is where the victim ends up. Japan, India, much of Western Europe, and the United States are all destination countries and the most common destinations for victims of human trafficking are Thailand, Japan, Israel, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, Italy, Turkey and the US, according to a report by the UNODC (United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime).

Almost every human trafficking prevention organization works to spread public awareness of trafficking. Several methods have been used to achieve public awareness, and while some produce little results, others have succeeded in persuading governments to pass laws and regulations on human trafficking. By pushing the issue of human trafficking into the public eye through the media, organizations work to educate the general public about the dangers of being trafficked and practices of preventing individuals from being trafficked. Television, magazines, newspapers, and radio are all used to warn and educate the public by providing statistics, scenarios, and general information on the subject.

Regardless of the type of human trafficking, nearly 1 in 5 of its victims was children, according to various reports. Their innocence is abused for begging, or exploited for sex as prostitutes, pedophilia or child pornography. Others are sold as child brides or camel jockeys.”

In a 2008 report on human trafficking, the U.S. State Department listed Kuwait, Oman, Qatar and Saudi Arabia as destination countries with widespread trafficking abuses, particularly forced laborers trafficked from Asia and Africa who are subject to restrictions on movement, withholding of passports, threats and physical and sexual abuse. The report found those countries made feeble efforts to rescue victims and prosecute traffickers. The department’s report also says slave labor in developing countries such as Brazil, China and India was fueling part of their huge economic growth. Other countries on the blacklist were Algeria, Cuba, Fiji, Iran, Myanmar, Moldova, North Korea, Papua New Guinea, Sudan and Syria.

According to the Report, the most common form of human trafficking (79%) is sexual exploitation. The victims of sexual exploitation are predominantly women and girls. In Central Asia and Eastern Europe, women make up more than 60 percent of those convicted of trafficking. The second most common form of human trafficking is forced labor, or slavery, making up 18 percent of the total, although the writers of the report say it may be underreported. Surprisingly, in 30% of the countries which provided information on the gender of traffickers, women make up the largest proportion of traffickers. The second most common form of human trafficking is forced labour counting 18 %. Worldwide, almost 20% of all trafficking victims are children. However, in some parts of Africa and the Mekong region, children are the majority, up to 100% in parts of West Africa.

Click at the picture for a larger image

5. War and abuse

Women and girls in war zones are especially touched by the ugly side of war. They are not able to defend themselves and after being abused or sold they are stigmatized in their communities besides ending up pregnant or with HIV/AIDS.

In August 2001, soldiers with the United Nations peacekeeping mission in Eritrea were purchasing 10 year old girls for sex in local hotels.

Before the arrival of 15,000 UN troops in Cambodia in 1991, there were an estimated 1,000 prostitutes in the capital. Currently, Cambodia’s illegal sex trade generates $500 million a year. No less than 55,000 women and children are sex slaves in Cambodia, 35 percent of which are younger than 18 years of age.

Over 5,000 women and children have been trafficked from the Philippines, Russia and Eastern Europe and are forced into prostitution in bars servicing the U.S. Military in South Korea.

6. Children – lost innocence

  • Children from Pakistan and Bangladesh are kidnapped or sold by their parents to traffickers who take them to Persian Gulf States including the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia, to work as camel jockeys. These children are 3 to 7 years of age and kept malnourished to keep their weight below 35 pounds. They suffer physical abuse from the traffickers and work all day training camels. Many of these children do also suffer extreme injuries or death from falling off camels during the races.
  • Child victims of trafficking are very vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. Misconceptions that having sex with a virgin can cure HIV/AIDS have fueled an increased demand for child prostitutes.
  • Girls from 15 to 17 years of age are trafficked from Thailand and Taiwan to South Africa. Traffickers recruited these girls to work as waitresses or domestic workers and once they arrive to South Africa they are forced into prostitution.
  • Filipino children are trafficked to countries in Africa, the Middle East, Western Europe and Southeast Asia, where they are sexually exploited. Traffickers loan parents a sum of money, which the girl must repay to the trafficker through forced prostitution. In one case, a Filipino woman rented her 9-year-old niece to foreign men for sex, and eventually sold her to a German pedophile.
  • 50,000 women and children are trafficked into the United States from no less than 49 countries every year. As many as 750,000 women and children have been trafficked into the United States over the last decade.
  • Women and children as young as 14 have been trafficked from Mexico to Florida and forced to have sex with as many as 130 clients per week in a trailer park. These women were kept hostage through threats and physical abuse, and were beaten and forced to have abortions. One woman was locked in a closet for 15 days after trying to escape.
  • In Fresno, California Hmong gang members have kidnapped girls between the ages of 11 and 14 and forced into prostitution. The gang members would beat and rape them into submission. These girls were trafficked within the United States and traded between other Hmong communities.
  • The Cadena smuggling ring brings women and some are as young as 14, from Mexico to Florida. The victims were forced to prostitute themselves with as many as 130 men per week in a trailer park. Of the $25 charged, the women received only $3. The Cadena members keep the women hostage through threats and physical abuse and the women must work until they paid off their debts of $2,000 to $3,000.
  • Domestic servants in some countries of the Middle East are forced to work 12 to 16 hours a day with little or no pay, and subject to sexual abuse such as rape, forced abortions, and physical abuse that has resulted in death.
  • Traffickers in many countries in West Africa take girls through voodoo rituals in which girls take oaths of silence and are often raped and beaten, prior to their leaving the country. They are also forced to sign agreements stating that, once they arrive in another country, they owe the traffickers a set amount of money. They are sworn to secrecy and given detailed accounts of how they will be tortured if they break their promise. Traffickers have taken women and young girls to shrines and places of cultural or religious significance; they remove pubic and other hair and then perform a ceremony of intimidation.

7. Human trafficking and the facts

  • An estimated number of 700.000 to 4 million people are forced in forced labor (including the sex industry) as a result of trafficking. Of these are:
  • 1.4 million – 56% are in Asia and the Pacific
  • 250.000 – 10% are in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • 230.000 – 9.2% are in the Middle East and Northern Africa
  • 130.000 – 5.2% are in sub-Saharan countries
  • 270.000 – 10.8% are in industrialized countries
  • 200.000 – 8% are in countries in transitions
  • 161 countries are reported to be affected by human trafficking by being a source, transit or destination count. People are reported to be trafficked from 127 countries to be exploited in 137 countries, affecting every continent and every type of economy.
  • The majority of trafficking victims are between 18 and 24 years of age and 1.2 million children are trafficked each year.
  • 95% of victims experienced physical or sexual violence.
  • 43% of victims are used for forced commercial sexual exploitation of which 98% are women and girls.
  • 32% of victims are used for forced economical exploitation of which 56% are women and girls.
  • 52% of those recruiting females are men, 42% are women and 6% are both men and women.
  • In 54% of the cases, the recruiter was a stranger to the victim, 46% of the cases, the recruiter knew the victim.
  • Estimated global annual profits made from the exploitation of all trafficked forced labor are US$ 31.6 billion. Of this:
  • US$ 15.5 billion – 49% – is generated in industrialized economies
  • US$ 9.7 billion – 30.6% is generated in Asia and the Pacific
  • US$ 1.3 billion – 4.1% is generated in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • US$ 1.6 billion – 5% is generated in sub-Saharan Africa
  • US$ 1.5 billion – 4.7% is generated in the Middle east and North Africa

Click at the picture for a larger image (statistics from 2008-2009)

8. Slavery and sex-trade in the Arab world


The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a destination for men and women, mostly from South and Southeast Asia, trafficked for the purposes of labor and commercial sexual exploitation. Migrant workers, who stand for more than 90% of the UAE’s private sector workforce, are recruited from India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Ethiopia, Eritrea, China, and the Philippines. Women from some of these countries travel willingly to work as domestic servants or administrative staff, but some are victims of forced labor, including unlawful withholding of passports, restrictions on movement, non-payment of wages, threats, or physical or sexual abuse. Men from India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Pakistan are drawn to the UAE for work in the construction sector, but are often subjected to conditions of involuntary servitude and debt bondage.

For the foreign female domestic workers, it is a life of isolation both physically, psychologically, socially and culturally. Some of these women live in abusive environments but others are able to live a little bit more socially. Under the law, once a foreign female worker enters a employers house, she is under his/her control since the employer is the visa sponsor. The employer bears total responsibility for his/her domestic workers and has total control over them. But during the first 3 months of the contract, both the employer and the employee have the right to contact the recruiting agency in order to report problems or to seek change in the status or employment of the foreign female domestic worker. Most recruiting agencies, however, do not encourage this practice, and often hide information from the foreign female domestic worker about their rights. The immigration regulations governing the status of domestic workers and the social practices towards foreign female domestic worker in the United Arab Emirates enslave them to their employers until the duration of their contract ends. Whether one is placed with a desirable or an undesirable employer is a matter of luck.

Saudi Arabia is a place for men and women from South East Asia and East Africa trafficked for the purpose of labor exploitation and forced begging for children from Yemen and Africa. Hundreds of thousands low skilled workers from India, Indonesia, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Eritrea and Kenya migrate voluntarily to Saudi Arabia to work. Many of these workers meet conditions of physical and sexual abuse, non-payment or delayed payment of wages, withholding of travel documents and restrictions on their freedom of movement.

Unfortunately, the government of Saudi Arabia has done little or almost nothing to eliminate trafficking and has lack of efforts to protect victims and prosecute those who are guilty of abuse. Some victims of abuse, chooses to leave the country rather than to confront their abusers in court and according to the law, they are required to file a complaint first before they can be allowed in any shelter. If a victim chooses to file a complaint, he/she is not allowed to work and the Saudi Government does in fat provide food and shelter for female workers who file report.

9. Iran – High profitable sex-trade


Iran has for 25 years, has enforced humiliating and punishments on women and girls, enslaved them in a system of segregation, forced veiling, second-class status, lashing, and stoning to death. Joining a global trend, in Tehran there has been a 635% increase in the number of teenage girls in prostitution. In Tehran, there are an estimated 84,000 women and girls in prostitution, many of them are on the streets, others are in the 250 brothels that exist in the city. The trade is also international as thousands of Iranian women and girls have been sold into sexual slavery abroad. The head of Iran’s Interpol bureau believes that the sex slave trade is one of the most profitable activities in Iran today and government officials themselves are involved in buying, selling, and sexually abusing women and girls.

Many of the girls come from poor families living in rural areas. Drug addiction has become epidemic throughout Iran, and some addicted parents sell their children to support their habits. There is also a problem with high unemployment, 28% for youth between 15-29 years of age and 43% for women between 15-20 years of age.

Popular destinations for victims of the slave trade are the Arab countries in the Persian Gulf because of the booming tourism and the good economy. According to the head of the Tehran province judiciary, traffickers target girls between 13 and 17 years old, although there are reports of some girls as young as 8. The victims are often physically punished and imprisoned besides being examined if they have engaged in “immoral activity.” Based on the findings, officials can ban them from leaving the country again.

Police have uncovered a number of prostitution and slavery rings operating from Tehran that have sold girls to France, Britain, Turkey, as well. One network based in Turkey bought smuggled Iranian women and girls, made fake passports, and transported them to European and Persian Gulf countries. In one case, a 16-year-old girl was smuggled to Turkey, and then sold to a 58-year-old European national for $20,000.

One factor contributing to the increase in prostitution and the sex slave trade is the number of teen girls who are running away from home for different reasons and 90% of girls who run away from home will end up in prostitution. As a result of runaways, in Tehran alone there are an estimated 25,000 street children, most of them girls. The perpetrators look after street children, runaways, and vulnerable high school girls in city parks and manage to convince them. In large cities, shelters have been set up to provide assistance for runaways but these places are often corrupt and run prostitution rings from the shelters. In one case, a woman was discovered selling Iranian girls to men in Persian Gulf countries; for four years, she had hunted down runaway girls and sold them. She even sold her own daughter for US$11,000.

For further information about the slave and sex trade and the work that is done to prevent, you can click into these links.

http://gvnet.com/humantrafficking/

http://www.humantrafficking.org/combat_trafficking/international_initiatives

India – Soft Power with Nuclear Arsenal

After introducing the economic reforms Indian has now came places. India now not only rose to a respected position on world platform but her economic boom & large population is also contributing to other countries growth story. Here are the few facts about India. Though after all this boom & applause India still remains a very poor country with increasing in equality, inflation & corruption damaging India’s repo as rising soft world power.

Facts about India:

$ 3.548 trillion GDP

India is the third richest country in Asia having $ 3.548 trillion GDP compared on Purchasing Power Parity. GDP per capita of India is $ 3, 1000 with growing population. India is the third wealthiest nation of Asia having a fastest growing economy which is progressing at a rate of 7% per year. 4th in the World after US, China & Japan.

3,165,596 Sq Kms

Is the Land Area of India making her a 7th largest country in the world & 2nd largest country in Asia.

2.67 million bbl/day Oil consumption

Even though India meet her 30% of oil consumption from her domestic oil blocks but the rest difference made her the fourth largest consumer of OIL & GAS this has lead in a huge investments on foreign exploration by Indian Oil & Gas giants. India consuming oil at 2.67 million bbl/day. The combination of oil consumption and relatively flat production has left India increasingly dependent on imports to meet its petroleum demand. In terms of oil use, transportation is the largest sector with highest consumption.

256 million tonnes per annum increasing by 45% annually

India is also the world’s biggest oil refiner with refining all daily raw crude of the Gulf Region & of its own. & host of a world biggest oil refining complex in Jamnagar – Gujarat.

1trillion US Dollars defence imports for next five year

As per Stockholm International Peace Research Institute India is the biggest buyer of arms in the world making a staggering 1 trillion US Dollars of purchase budget for arms imports.

40million tonnes of wheat, 30million tonnes of oil seeds

Is the consumption which requires satisfying the population hunger of India as per UPI Asia estimates? Even though India is in some respect is self sufficient in agricultural production but as the population grows India is now looking to satisfy her hunger through imports last year India imports 5 million tons of wheat & another 7% more oil seeds, even after the bumper crop India have to import other food items respectively. India also supports the largest cattle population in the world making India self sufficient in meat & dairy products supporting the 2nd most populated country in the world with figures going more than 1.2 billion people.

64,215kms

Is the length of Indian Railway network which is the fourth largest in the world carrying 25million passengers & 2.5million tons of freight daily & employing 1.6million people which makes it the largest employer of the world.

3.314 million Kilometres

Is the total length of India’s road network positioning at the worlds third largest. India has the world’s highest road density.

752 Million

Are mobile phone users making India the world’s fastest growing wireless market & positioning India at 3rd place in the world’s list of mobile phone subscribers?

500000

India is the home of the World’s largest ship breaking yard which employees more than 500000 people & breaks almost all the retired shipping vessels of the world. It also houses the one of the world’s largest shipping industry also.

India has now become a second country after US who has launched mission on moon successfully. This has made India a global hub for space technology & aero space engineering which is not only efficient but also cheapest in the world.

Nearly 70% of the information technology & software development & research is done in India making it a largest silicon valley hub of the world.

India has become outsourcing power & centre of the world as almost all the outsourcing in all services being sourced from here. Indian economy before 1990 was agriculture driven economy but now India is a service driven economy transforming her into a technology power house & synonymously tagging a Soft Power Tag.

Almost 70% of the world’s nanotechnology, biotechnological need is being researched & sourced from India.

Pharmaceutical sector is another which is now advancing with enormous pace making it one of the biggest pharma sectors in the world.

After China, India has the world’s highest density of cars where almost every car maker has its manufacturing facility specially designed for meeting Indian demand & also for export purposes. In Delhi alone 1200 cars are sold every day & another 1000 add on the road making Delhi 2nd most polluted city after Beijing as per WHO report. Resulting in a huge traffic jams & increased numbers of road accidents.

India is the largest consumer of Palm Oil in the world 80% of the Palm Oil produced annually in the world is consumed by India.

India is the largest consumer of Gold & Silver in the world where nearly 68% of the total production is consumed by the Indians only.

India is the hub of the world’s largest diamond cutting industry where 9 out of 10 diamonds in the world are cut in India.

Natural Resources:

Indian is the largest producer of Mica in the world, India has huge reserves of coal, iron ore, bauxite, uranium, titanium, thorium, zinc, copper, silver, gold, limestone, bronze, precious stones, granite, marble which rank India in the top five. India also has proven sufficient reserves of natural gas, oil, shale gas.

India – Land of Versatility

Map of Ancient India

When Prophet Adam’s (peace be upon him) first foot set on the earth it was on the Indian Subcontinent & his beloved respected Eve’s on Jeddah the world has hardly knows about the undivided Pangaea which broke apart & the nations formed with streams of blood flowing & forming the line of control dividing families & heart of the children of Adam. It was the era of division & rule when new empires were formed & broke apart by the invaders during this period there was civilization which was flourishing on the banks of Indus creating & designing its own world of cultures, tradition & science, the nation which was carved by those great people was named Akhand Bharat translated later in English by traitors of British Imperials as India which it now popularly called & known as. Now the history was in the making & the world is going to know about the massive silent storm which was deepening its roots throughout the world. The veins of Indian nation are as old as the humans himself. Once called the Golden Sparrow of the world famous for her science, spices, precious gem stones & natural resources was the world leader in terms of economic output & industrialization. India is a land of mother of all civilization famed as “Indus Valley civilization”.  It is the most diverse & multicultural, multiracial nation in the world.  It is said that you will find lingual & cultural variations on every 10 kms in India. India is the land of philosophers, poets & writers. It is where Alexander lost his first battle & was died of his wounds, it is where descendants of Genghis Khan flourished & were settled down here making India center of their architecture & art. It is the land where Sufism flourished & nurtured its roots from the alluvial plains of great Indian rivers.

Inventions / Discoveries:

Mathematics which include Zero, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, Astrology, Astronomy, Politics, Ayurveda traditional Indian Medicine practice, Yoga, Karate, Chess, Tunnel construction, Horticulture, rocket launchers, swords, bow and arrow, jewelery ,diamond, ruby, gold, silver, iron animal husbandry, dry land farming, Wheel, Fire, Human Resource Management, Irrigation, Classical Music, Thorium Fusion reactors, Jungle Warfare. Indian mouth freshener beetle leaf (paan) was first cultivated discovered in India, beetle nut was also discovered here, cashew nut, henna, walnut, neem, marijuana were first discovered.

Religions formed & written: Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Sikhism.

Languages: Sanskrit, Pali, Hindi, Urdu, Punjabi, Bengali, Gujrati, Devnagri script which forms the bases of Telugu, Malayalam, Tamil, Kashmiri, Dogri, Kangri, Sindhi, Marathi, Konkani, Oriya, Manipuri, Mizo, Assamese, Bhojpuri, Nicobari, Prakrit & many countless tribal languages.

Holy Scriptures written: Vedas, Upanishads, Ramayan, Mahabharat, Geeta, Guru Granth Sahib, Tripitaka, Mahayana Sutras, Akaranga Sutra & Kalpa Sutra.

Himalayas

Topography – Geography:

In the North Himalaya & Zanskar guards her Frontiers with snow covered peaks & glaciers all year round stretch your arm to the through terrain region, East one will found Arakran Mountains covred with tropical dense jungles as you moved to west the jungle goes deeper  crossing the world’s biggest river delta of Ganga Brahmaputra ending in the central plateau where driving through the most fertile alluvial plains nourished by the waters of the great rivers of Ganga & Yamuna as you move closer to the west the nature leads you towards Thar desert & salt plains of Rann of Kutch where hardly you find

Arakan Mountain Range

a drop of water, turning yourself towards south via salt plains of Rann of Kutch Deccan Plateau welcomes you with its exotic scenery with its cousins Satpura , Vindhya, Western Ghats & Eastern Ghats where your feet will be washed by thethree crystal clear greenish waters of Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal & Indian Ocean taking you to the all new world of advancement of completely with air becomes fresh & cool soothes you through its humid climate of varied cultures & traditions which survives on a world’s longest coastline spanning more than 7000kms. As the road ends of the mainland one can still find himself in India when he chooses to travel the distant archipelagos of Andaman & Nicobar Islands & Lakshadweep Islands.

Historic Frontiers’ with 10 Great Nations full of history & civilization glory;

In North China, Tibet & Afghanistan, Nepal & Bhutan shares their cultures & politics, West its Iran & Pakistan, East thriving jungles invades its plains with Burma, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam & Bangladesh. Her sea frontier even in modern time touches the class of Sri Lanka, Maldives, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia & Singapore through strait of Malaca, Adams Bridge, Adaman Sea, Lakshwadeep Islands.

Modern Frontiers with 7 left to wipe her tears:

After 1947 India has lost much of her ancient boundaries where it has lost Burma & Bangladesh in the east; in the west her souls torn apart by losing away Pakistan & parts of Kashmir, Gilgit, Waziristan & Baltistan losing its touch from ancient neighbours Iran & Afghanistan, in the north the story is not so different as her dry but precious land Aksai Chin which is now a part of Xinjiang province was snatched away by her once friendly brotherly ancient neighbour China & her friendly friend lost battle to China who captured Tibet sheltering his government in exile in their home away from home Dharamshala – Himachal Pradesh.  Now India only borders with China, Nepal & Bhutan in the North, Pakistan in the west, Burma & Bangladesh in east & south provides still undivided victims of British Raj i;e Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore & Indonesia through Andaman Sea, Bay of Bengal Malaca Strait, Indian Ocean. Sri Lanka & Maldives with Adams Bridge & Indian Ocean & Sea of Lakshwadeep & Arabian Sea.

When India wakes up with her lost glory there was nothing but a pledge that someday we will take our glory & respect back from this traitor world. With the introduction of constitution in 1950 when India become Republic lots of promises & policies were made which laid the foundation of the modern & prosperous India. Investments were made to build infrastructure for the looted & divided nation. By the end of 1980s & the end of cold war era India has improved a lot, once said by the First Prime Minister of India Pt. Jawahar Lal Nehru that the dams which we have build are the temples of modern India. With the introduction of economic reforms by the then Finance Minister Man Mohan Singh India opened her gates for foreign investment. Now with the result of this India by the start of 21st century has now become a booming power house who now excels in the field of Information Technology, Engineering, Software, Agriculture, Health & Medical Facilities, Education, Aero space, Bio & Nano Technology, Nuclear science. The facts show that from the mid 90s till today India has taken a huge jump forward. The dominance of India now shows & sometimes reflects in the international summits like G8, SAARC, ASEAN, UN, IAEA, WTO, BIMSTEC surviving with the burden of overpopulation whose hunger is never ending. Today India is a economic power house with the world at her feet. As per UN economic data report India will surpass the US GDP by 2050. This has not only made India a biggest challenger & threat to US but also to her neighbours.

World News Headlines of March 15

New blast at Japan nuke plant, radiation threat rises

SENDAI, Japan (AFP) – Japan’s nuclear crisis escalated Tuesday as two more blasts and a fire rocked a quake-stricken atomic power plant, sending radiation up to dangerous levels. Radiation around the Fukushima No.1 plant on the eastern coast had “risen considerably”, Prime Minister Naoto Kan said, and his chief spokesman…

Fresh explosion at quake-hit Japan nuclear plant

SOMA (Japan): A third explosion in four days rocked the earthquake-damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in northeast Japan early Tuesday, the country’s nuclear safety agency said. The blast at Daiichi Unit 2 followed two hydrogen explosions at the plant — the latest on Monday — as authorities struggle to prevent the catastrophic…

Gaddafi cranks up pressure, jets bomb rebels

AJDABIYAH (Libya): Muammar Gaddafi’s jets bombed Libyan rebels on Monday, aiding a counter-offensive that has pushed insurgents 160km eastwards in a week, as France pressed for a no-fly zone “as fast as possible”. Gaddafi’s government, at first reeling from widespread popular uprisings last month, is now confident of success.

Gulf nations send forces to Bahrain

A military force from Saudi Arabia and other Gulf nations moved into Bahrain Monday to help restore security after a month of anti-regime protests, the Associated Press reported. The force marked the first cross-border military operation to quell unrest since the Arab world’s rebellions began in December.

Bomber Kills 36 Outside Afghan Recruiting Center

KABUL, Afghanistan — A Taliban suicide bomber posing as an army recruit blew himself up in the midst of a crowd outside a Afghanistan military recruiting center Monday in the northern city of Kunduz, killing at least 36 people including five children, the authorities there said. It was the fourth suicide bombing in Kunduz Province since…

Indian Navy nabs 61 pirates after intercepting their vessel

KOCHI: In a breakthrough in anti-piracy operations, the Indian Navy intercepted a mother vessel of Somali pirates in the Arabian Sea about 00 nautical miles off Kochi and rescued 13 crew members apart from nabbing 61 pirates. Naval ships and aircraft are presently in the area and are still carrying out search operations for missing fishermen or…

Suicide bomber kills 10 soldiers at Iraq army post

A SUICIDE bomber blew up his booby-trapped car early today outside an Iraqi army battalion headquarters in the country’s east, killing 10 soldiers and wounding 29 people in a bombing that brought down the building. Diyala provincial council spokeswoman Samira al-Shibli said…

India ‘world’s biggest arms buyer’

India has overtaken China to become the world’s largest importer of weapons, according to a Swedish think-tank that monitors global arms sales. The Stockholm International Peace Research Institute report said India was pushing ahead with plans to modernise its military in an effort to counter China’s influence and gain international clout.

Latest World News

 

Important Events on March 15

March 15: Ides of March; National Day in Hungary (1848); Hōnen Matsuri in Japan

Nicholas II, the last Tsar of Russia

  • 44 BC – Dictator Julius Caesar of the Roman Republic was stabbed to death by Marcus Junius Brutus and several other Roman senators.
  • 1776 – South Carolina became the first of Great Britain’s North American colonies to declare its independence.
  • 1917 – Tsar Nicholas II (pictured) of Russia was forced to abdicate in the February Revolution, ending three centuries of Romanov rule.
  • 1943 – World War II: German forces recaptured Kharkov after four days of house-to-house fighting against Soviet troops, ending the month-long Third Battle of Kharkov.
  • 1985 – The company Symbolics became the first ever entity, individual or party to register a .com top-level domain name: symbolics.com.

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